Category Archives: OHW Magazine

Welcome to Issue #3 of Okanagan Health & Wellness Magazine

ITL Fall issue of Magazine

Welcome to our latest issue of OHW Magazine! As always, we’re bringing you articles addressing a wide array of health and wellness topics: From physical to mental and emotional wellness, from external influences to internal harmony, from the benefits of walking to the benefits of probiotics for smelly shoes, you’ll find something of interest here. And again, as always, we thank our wonderful contributors and advertisers for helping us bring this magazine to you. Continue reading

Shoulder pain

An Alternative Healing for Shoulder Injuries

By Kelly Harrison, DC

If you thought you had no choice but to live with acute or chronic shoulder pain, Class IV laser therapy may be what you’ve been missing.

Last year, while cooling down after a jog, I had no idea that my life was about to change. While walking, I was struck from behind by a cyclist in what would surely have been a five-minute major and a lengthy suspension in any hockey league. My shoulder was dislocated, I had sharp shooting pains into my arm, and I knew that I would be facing an uncertain time until I could return to practising chiropractic. After a ride in an ambulance and x-rays, I learned that the accident had fractured both my arm and scapula (shoulder blade). The following week, an MRI revealed two major tears and two minor tears in the rotator cuff and corresponding muscles. This caused me further stress as to my future because while I had dislocated my shoulder before, it was never to this extreme, and I was unsure what my career as a chiropractor would look like after the injury had healed. Continue reading

Hand pain

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Are You At Risk?

By Donna McAllister, BSc (Hons), DC, Rob Mutch, BA, DC, and Michael Schmidt, BPhEd, DC

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common problem involving the wrists and hands. Symptoms include numbness, tingling, and weakness in the thumb, index, or middle finger.

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is usually found in people who perform repetitive motions with the hands such as typists, checkout staff, hairdressers, and mechanics and it accounts for a high percentage of workplace injuries. CTS was originally thought to primarily affect women, but we now know it is more related to your occupation than your gender. Continue reading